Creating a Travelogue

Creating a Travelogue

Hi there. I’m Holly. First, I want to thank Caylee for having me on her blog! It’s so wonderful to share this post in her beautiful space on the internet. Now, let’s get to it. I’m here to share my love of midori traveler’s notebooks!

Creating a Travelogue - How to use a Midori Traveler's Notebook to create a travelogue that records your journaling on the trip

I fell in love with midori traveler’s notebooks (standard size) ever since I first saw one put together by Amy Tan on YouTube. Heart Eyes! So, I started collecting them here and there, in an obsessed kind of way. Last August, we went on a week long trip to a place we go to every few years, the Pacific Northwest.

I decided I MUST use one of these babies while we were there.

Creating a Travelogue - How to use a Midori Traveler's Notebook to create a travelogue that records your journaling on the trip

I did a post over on my blog all about what I did to prep a midori for the trip. While on vacation, I journaled about what we did each day right in my midori I had prepped. I did leave a few blank pages here and there, but mostly the journaling was at the front of the book.

Creating a Travelogue - How to use a Midori Traveler's Notebook to create a travelogue that records your journaling on the trip

Shortly after we got back home, I added a few embellishments, some watercolors, a few key photos, but I couldn’t decide what else to do with it. Then, I realized, this is a trip we do AGAIN and AGAIN. Am I really going to include all these photos in a big vacation album, or in my Project Life album? No.  I decided to make a mini-album with all the photos from the week right in this midori insert.

Creating a Travelogue - How to use a Midori Traveler's Notebook to create a travelogue that records your journaling on the trip

But, I had a lot of photos. Typical me.

With this size book, it’s a lot of fun to use smaller photos than the typical 4×6. (Although, a few full 4×6’s are great to include, also.) I decided to collage all my photos. I used the PicStitch app right on my phone to do this. I grouped them by activity and kept them in chronological order.

This lent itself to more cohesive layouts.

All the photos in one layout had the same location backgrounds. (hiking in the forest, playing on the beach, etc).

Creating a Travelogue - How to use a Midori Traveler's Notebook to create a travelogue that records your journaling on the trip

So, once I had collaged all my pictures and got them back from the photo lab, I started laying them out, leaving some space for embellishments and watercolor. My main goal here was to make sure that I used the whole book up and that it wasn’t overcrowded with photos. Some photos I left as 4×6 collages, some I cut apart to give variety to my book.

Creating a Travelogue - How to use a Midori Traveler's Notebook to create a travelogue that records your journaling on the trip

A watercolor trick I learned while making this traveler’s notebook.

I started getting braver with watercolors. One piece of advice that I will pass on to you, if you are using a regular midori notebook with regular paper in it, you may like to first back the page you plan to watercolor with some heavy cardstock or scrapbook papers. I didn’t do this EVERY time and honestly, I love the wrinkly pages. That said, when I backed the page first, it did help keep the paper flatter, since it had something to soak up some of the water.

This is kind of sneaky! In the above lighthouse pages, I first backed the right hand side with scrapbook paper. I used a circle pattern that was showing through from the backside to create the watercolor circles. It was an easy way to keep the pattern straight and consistent. And so much FUN to do.

Creating a Travelogue - How to use a Midori Traveler's Notebook to create a travelogue that records your journaling on the trip Creating a Travelogue - How to use a Midori Traveler's Notebook to create a travelogue that records your journaling on the trip

Layering your watercolors.

I like putting a wash down first and drying it out with my heat gun (because I’m impatient) and then coming back later to add a little more detail on top of that layer. Repeat again. More detail. DISCLAIMER: some of my page bases were from a Daisydori printable from Cocoa Daisy.  I even layered watercolor on top of those!

Creating a Travelogue - How to use a Midori Traveler's Notebook to create a travelogue that records your journaling on the trip

I like big titles and I can not lie….

Make them stand out on your midori notebook. They look great. Combine fonts. I painted a big block “Cape” with a smaller “Perpetua” in script. Since I did the detailed journaling at the front of this book, I put little “clues” throughout the book to help tie the photo story to the words.

Creating a Travelogue - How to use a Midori Traveler's Notebook to create a travelogue that records your journaling on the trip

Here, I first put the blue watercolor wash on the two inside areas of these pages. After it dried (with the speedy help of my heat gun), I adhered the two strips of sea shell scrapbook papers (Carta Bella Ahoy There line) to the outside edges. Next, I glued down the photos to each page. Then, I added the little Amy Tan embellishment. And finally, my watercolors came out again to add all the pink hearts.

Supplies List

(it’s a big one)

If you would like to see a flip through of my whole book, please jump over to my post here where I am sharing it.

Guest Post by Holly

Holly

Holly Genc is a creative at www.paintedladiesjournal.com where she shares lots of Project Life inspiration, crafty tutorials, organization ideas and creative team projects. She’s an urban mama to three littles (age 7, 5 and 3), living in Chicago. With a background in architecture, she has a passion for graphic design and hopes to inspire other creative types along the way.

Say hello on her blogFacebook, Instagram, and Pinterest (and tell her Caylee says hi!)

Pin It on Pinterest